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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:10 PM Thread Starter
 
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You all should be drinking green tea and heres why!

Guys,
These are boring but for most of them they ahve a Conclussion clearly stated at the end. Just read the end part. the details of the study im sure none of us really know what they are talking about.



Effects of green tea intake on the development of coronary artery disease.

Sano J, Inami S, Seimiya K, Ohba T, Sakai S, Takano T, Mizuno K.

Department of Medicine, Chiba Hokusoh Hospital, Nippon Medical School, Chiba, Japan. [email protected]

BACKGROUND: Green tea, a popular beverage in Japan, contains many polyphenolic antioxidants, which might prevent atherosclerosis. This study was designed to determine whether the consumption of green tea is proportionately associated with a decreased incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular prognosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study group comprised 203 patients who underwent coronary angiography (109 patients with significant coronary stenosis and 94 patients without). Predictors for CAD were analyzed and the patients' cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events were followed. Green tea consumption was significantly higher in patients without CAD than in those with CAD (5.9+/-0.5 vs 3.5+/-0.3 cups/day; p<0.001). An inverse relationship between the intake of green tea and the incidence of CAD was observed (p<0.001). The green tea intake per day was an independent predictor for CAD based on a multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio: 0.84 and 95% confidence interval: 0.76-0.91). In contrast, the green tea intake was not a predictor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events based on the Cox proportional hazard model. CONCLUSIONS: Green tea consumption was associated with a lower incidence of CAD in the present study population in Japan. Therefore, the more green tea patients consume, the less likely they are to have CAD.

PMID: 15226633 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:11 PM Thread Starter
 
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Antioxidants of the beverage tea in promotion of human health.

Siddiqui IA, Afaq F, Adhami VM, Ahmad N, Mukhtar H.

Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA.

Tea that contains many antioxidants is a pleasant and safe drink that is enjoyed by people across the globe. Tea leaves are manufactured as black, green, or oolong. Black tea represents approximately 78% of total consumed tea in the world, whereas green tea accounts for approximately 20% of tea consumed. The concept of "use of tea for promotion of human health and prevention and cure of diseases" has become a subject of intense research in the last decade. Diseases for which tea drinkers appear to have lower risk are simple infections, like bacterial and viral, to chronic debilitating diseases, including cancer, coronary heart disease, stroke, and osteoporosis. Initial work on green tea suggested that it possesses human health-promoting effects. In recent years, the research efforts have been expanded to black tea as well. Research conducted in recent years reveals that both black and green tea have very similar beneficial attributes in lowering the risk of many human diseases, including several types of cancer and heart diseases. For cancer prevention, evidence is so overwhelming that the Chemoprevention Branch of the National Cancer Institute has initiated a plan for developing tea compounds as cancer-chemopreventive agents in human trials. Thus, modern medical research is confirming the ancient wisdom that therapy of many diseases may reside in an inexpensive beverage in a "teapot."

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* Review
* Review, Tutorial


PMID: 15130283 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:12 PM Thread Starter
 
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Effect of increased tea consumption on oxidative DNA damage among smokers: a randomized controlled study.

Hakim IA, Harris RB, Brown S, Chow HH, Wiseman S, Agarwal S, Talbot W.

Mel and Enid Zuckerman Arizona College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA. [email protected]

Tea drinking has been associated with decreased occurrence of cancer and heart disease. One potential mechanism for these findings is the strong antioxidant effect of tea polyphenols. A phase II randomized controlled tea intervention trial was designed to study the effect of high consumption (4 cups/d) of decaffeinated green or black tea on oxidative DNA damage as measured by urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) among smokers over a 4-mo period. A total of 143 heavy smokers, aged 18-79 y, were randomized to drink either green or black tea or water. Levels of plasma and urinary catechins and urinary 8-OHdG were measured monthly. A total of 133 of 143 smokers completed the 4-mo intervention. Multiple linear regression models were used to estimate the main effects and interaction effect of green and black tea consumption on creatinine-adjusted urinary 8-OHdG, with or without adjustment for potential confounders. Plasma and urinary levels of catechins rose significantly in the green tea group compared with the other two groups. Assessment of urinary 8-OHdG after adjustment for baseline measurements and other potential confounders revealed a highly significant decrease in urinary 8-OHdG (-31%) after 4 mo of drinking decaffeinated green tea (P = 0.002). No change in urinary 8-OHdG was seen among smokers assigned to the black tea group. These data suggest that regular green tea drinking might protect smokers from oxidative damages and could reduce cancer risk or other diseases caused by free radicals associated with smoking.

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* Clinical Trial
* Randomized Controlled Trial


PMID: 14519830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:14 PM
 
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can you summerize that? :
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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
 
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Relation between green tea consumption and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis among Japanese men and women.

Sasazuki S, Kodama H, Yoshimasu K, Liu Y, Washio M, Tanaka K, Tokunaga S, Kono S, Arai H, Doi Y, Kawano T, Nakagaki O, Takada K, Koyanagi S, Hiyamuta K, Nii T, Shirai K, Ideishi M, Arakawa K, Mohri M, Takeshita A.

Department of Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

PURPOSE: To examine the relation between green tea consumption and arteriographically determined coronary atherosclerosis. METHODS: Study subjects were 512 patients (302 men and 210 women) aged 30 years or older who underwent coronary arteriography for the first time at four hospitals in Fukuoka City or one hospital in an adjacent city between September 1996 and August 1997. Lifestyle characteristics including green tea consumption were ascertained before arteriography by a questionnaire supported with interview. RESULTS: 117 men (38.7%) and 50 women (23.8%) had significant stenosis of one or more coronary arteries. Green tea consumption tended to be inversely associated with coronary atherosclerosis in men, but not in women. An evident, protective association between green tea and coronary atherosclerosis was observed in a subgroup of 262 men excluding those under dietary or drug treatment for diabetes mellitus. In this subgroup, after adjustment for traditional coronary risk factors and coffee, odds ratios of significant stenosis for consumption of 2-3 cups and 4 or more cups per day were 0.5 (95% confidence interval 0.2-1.2) and 0.4 (0.2-0.9), respectively, as compared with a consumption of one cup per day or less. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that green tea may be protective against coronary atherosclerosis at least in men.

PMID: 10964006 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:16 PM Thread Starter
 
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Protective effect of green tea against prostate cancer: a case-control study in southeast China.

Jian L, Xie LP, Lee AH, Binns CW.

School of Public Health, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA, Australia.

To investigate whether green tea consumption has an etiological association with prostate cancer, a case-control study was conducted in Hangzhou, southeast China during 2001-2002. The cases were 130 incident patients with histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The controls were 274 hospital inpatients without prostate cancer or any other malignant diseases, and matched to the age of cases. Information on duration, quantity and frequency of usual tea consumption, as well as the number of new batches brewed per day, were collected by face-to-face interview using a structured questionnaire. The risk of prostate cancer for tea consumption was assessed using multivariate logistic regression adjusting for age, locality, education, income, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, total fat intake, marital status, age at marriage, number of children, history of vasectomy and family history of prostate cancer. Among the cases, 55.4% were tea drinkers compared to 79.9% for the controls. Almost all the tea consumed was green tea. The prostate cancer risk declined with increasing frequency, duration and quantity of green tea consumption. The adjusted odds ratio (OR), relative to non-tea drinkers, were 0.28 (95% CI = 0.17-0.47) for tea drinking, 0.12 (95% CI = 0.06-0.26) for drinking tea over 40 years, 0.09 (95% CI = 0.04-0.21) for those consuming more than 1.5 kg of tea leaves yearly, and 0.27 (95% CI = 0.15-0.48) for those drinking more than 3 cups (1 litre) daily. The dose response relationships were also significant, suggesting that green tea is protective against prostate cancer. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

PMID: 14618627 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:17 PM Thread Starter
 
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Cancer therapy and prevention by green tea: role of ornithine decarboxylase.

Bachrach U, Wang YC.

Department of Molecular Biology, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel. [email protected]

Green tea which is widely consumed in China, Japan and India, contains polyphenolic compounds, which account for 30% of the dry weight of the leaves. Most of the polyphenols are flavanols, of which (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is most abundant. Epidemiological studies revealed that the incidences of stomach and prostate cancers are the lowest in the world among a population that consumes green tea on a regular basis. It has also been reported that the quantity of green tea consumed, plays an important role in reducing cancer risk and in delaying cancer outbreak and recurrence. Various systems were used to confirm anti-cancer activities of green tea and/or EGCG. These included experimental animals in which cancer was induced chemically. Cultured cells transformed chemically or by oncogenes were also used. These studies clearly demonstrated that green tea or EGCG have anticancer and cancer preventive properties. The mechanisms of these activities have also been studied in details. It has been shown that green tea and its active components interfere with signal transduction pathways. Thus the activities of various protein kinases are inhibited, the expression of nuclear proto-oncogenes declines and the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is reduced. ODC, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of polyamines is closely linked with cellular proliferation and carcinogenesis. Inhibitors of ODC, like alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) have long been used for cancer prevention and therapy. It has been suggested that polyamine depletion by green tea could offer one explanation for its anti-cancer activities.

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PMID: 12025870 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
 
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Ingestion of a tea rich in catechins leads to a reduction in body fat and malondialdehyde-modified LDL in men.

Nagao T, Komine Y, Soga S, Meguro S, Hase T, Tanaka Y, Tokimitsu I.

Health Care Products Research Laboratories No.1, Kao Corporation, Tokyo.

BACKGROUND: Catechins, the major component of green tea extract, have various physiologic effects. There are few studies, however, on the effects of catechins on body fat reduction in humans. It has been reported that the body mass index (BMI) correlates with the amount of malondialdehyde and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the blood. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effect of catechins on body fat reduction and the relation between oxidized LDL and body fat variables. DESIGN: After a 2-wk diet run-in period, healthy Japanese men were divided into 2 groups with similar BMI and waist circumference distributions. A 12-wk double-blind study was performed in which the subjects ingested 1 bottle oolong tea/d containing 690 mg catechins (green tea extract group; n = 17) or 1 bottle oolong tea/d containing 22 mg catechins (control group; n = 18). RESULTS: Body weight, BMI, waist circumference, body fat mass, and subcutaneous fat area were significantly lower in the green tea extract group than in the control group. Changes in the concentrations of malondialdehyde-modified LDL were positively associated with changes in body fat mass and total fat area in the green tea extract group. CONCLUSION: Daily consumption of tea containing 690 mg catechins for 12 wk reduced body fat, which suggests that the ingestion of catechins might be useful in the prevention and improvement of lifestyle-related diseases, mainly obesity.

PMID: 15640470 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:20 PM Thread Starter
 
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The Effects of Green Tea Consumption on Incidence of Breast Cancer and Recurrence of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Seely D, Mills EJ, Wu P, Verma S, Guyatt GH.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [email protected].

Background: Green tea is widely used by women for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. The authors aimed to determine the efficacy of green tea ingestion on the risk of breast cancer development and the risk of breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses of observational studies from systematic searches of 8 electronic data sources and contact with authors. They included studies assessing breast cancer incidence and recurrence. RESULTS: Results: The pooled relative risk (RR) of developing breast cancer for the highest levels of green tea consumption in cohort studies was 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-1.1; P= .28; I(2)= 0%), and in case control studies, the odds ratio was 0.44 (95% CI, 0.14-1.31; P= .14; I(2)= 47%). The pooled RR of cohort studies for breast cancer recurrence in all stages was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.47-1.19; P= .22; I(2)= 37%). A subgroup analysis of recurrence in stage I and II disease showed a pooled RR in cohort studies of 0.56 (95% CI, 0.38-0.83; P= .004; I(2)= 0%). Dose-response relationships were evident in only 3 of the 7 studies. CONCLUSION: To date, the epidemiological data indicates that consumption of 5 or more cups of green tea a day shows a non-statistically significant trend towards the prevention of breast cancer development. Evidence indicates that green tea consumption may possibly help prevent breast cancer recurrence in early stage (I and II) cancers. However, conclusions as to the potential therapeutic application of green tea are currently impossible to make due to the small number of studies conducted, the lack of any clinical trial evidence, the lack of a consistent dose-response relationship, and the potential for interaction with standard care.
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:21 PM Thread Starter
 
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Clinical trials in cancer prevention: current results and perspectives for the future.

Greenwald P.

Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. [email protected]

Cancer prevention remains the ideal strategy for reducing the burden of cancer on society. Progress in cancer prevention has been accelerated as prevention clinical trials are completed and reported. A promising strategy is the identification of cancer risk factors through epidemiologic and experimental research with lifestyle and medical approaches that allow translation of clinical trial results to clinical practice. A major focus of cancer prevention clinical trials has been on modulation of hormones and nutritional modifications using natural or synthetic bioactive food components for breast and prostate cancer. Breast cancer prevention clinical trials have investigated the role of estrogen antagonists with agents such as tamoxifen, raloxifene, and newer agents such as aromatase inhibitors and bioactive food components. Among the promising bioactive food components being investigated at the National Cancer Institute in prevention clinical trials to reduce breast cancer risk are indole-3-carbinol, sulforaphanes, phytoestrogen isoflavones, perillyl alcohol, and green tea polyphenols. Prostate cancer prevention trials have focused on hormone modulation with the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride and bioactive food components such as selenium and vitamin E. Soy isoflavones, green tea polyphenols, and doxercalciferol also are being investigated for prostate cancer prevention. Future prevention clinical trials will rely on multidisciplinary medical approaches that bring together expertise in many fields to address disease across the cancer spectrum. Nutritional science can play an important role in this effort through the use of new and emerging technologies to better understand the influence of bioactive food components on the genes, proteins, and cellular processes that are associated with cancer risk.

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* Review
* Review, Tutorial


PMID: 15570061 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #11 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:22 PM Thread Starter
 
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Neurological mechanisms of green tea polyphenols in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

Weinreb O, Mandel S, Amit T, Youdim MB.

Eve Topf and USA National Parkinson Foundation Centers of Excellence for Neurodegenerative Diseases Research and Department of Pharmacology, Rappaport Family Research Institute, Technion-Faculty of Medicine, 31096 Haifa, Israel.

Tea consumption is varying its status from a mere ancient beverage and a lifestyle habit, to a nutrient endowed with possible prospective neurobiological-pharmacological actions beneficial to human health. Accumulating evidence suggest that oxidative stress resulting in reactive oxygen species generation and inflammation play a pivotal role in neurodegenerative diseases, supporting the implementation of radical scavengers, transition metal (e.g., iron and copper) chelators, and nonvitamin natural antioxidant polyphenols in the clinic. These observations are in line with the current view that polyphenolic dietary supplementation may have an impact on cognitive deficits in individuals of advanced age. As a consequence, green tea polyphenols are now being considered as therapeutic agents in well controlled epidemiological studies, aimed to alter brain aging processes and to serve as possible neuroprotective agents in progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In particular, literature on the putative novel neuroprotective mechanism of the major green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, are examined and discussed in this review.

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PMID: 15350981 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE
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post #12 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OffSett
can you summerize that? :
:imwst In less than 10 words pls... :
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post #13 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:22 PM
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if you think i'm gonna read that much about green tea you got another thing coming

i'm already on green tea though LOL i like it haha, and it's all YER fault


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post #14 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:23 PM Thread Starter
 
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Suppressive effect of green tea catechins on morphologic and functional regression of the brain in aged mice with accelerated senescence (SAMP10).

Unno K, Takabayashi F, Kishido T, Oku N.

Department of Medical Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, 422-8526, Japan. [email protected]

Green tea catechins (GT-catechins) have been reported to have an antioxidative effect. We investigated the effect of long-term GT-catechin intake on aging and oxidative damage using aged mice with accelerated senescence (SAMP10), a model of brain senescence with cerebral atrophy and cognitive dysfunction. Major atrophy was observed in the rhinencephalon, hippocampus and striatum of 12-month-old untreated SAMP10 mice. Similarly, levels of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage, were higher in these parts of the cerebrum than in the cerebral cortex and liver. GT-catechin intake effectively suppressed such atrophy in 12-month-old SAMP10 mice. A preventive effect of GT-catechin intake on oxidative DNA damage was also observed in the rhinencephalon (an area particularly susceptible to atrophy) at 6 months of age, i.e. during the early stages of atrophy. A suppressive effect of GT-catechin intake on cognitive dysfunction, as determined by the learning time needed to acquire an avoidance response and assessments of working memory in a Y-maze, was also found in 12-month-old mice. These results suggest that GT-catechin intake partially improves the morphologic and functional alterations that occur naturally in the brains of aged SAMP10 mice.

PMID: 15236762 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #15 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:25 PM Thread Starter
 
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Green tea protection against age-dependent ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

Luczaj W, Waszkiewicz E, Skrzydlewska E, Roszkowska-Jakimiec W.

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland.

Ethanol intoxication leads to oxidative stress, which may be additionally enhanced by aging. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of green tea as a source of water-soluble antioxidants on the ability to prevent oxidative stress in aged rats sub-chronically intoxicated with ethanol. Two-, 12-, and 24-mo-old male Wistar rats were divided into 4 experimental groups: (1) control, (2) green tea, (3) ethanol, and (4) ethanol and green tea. Ethanol intoxication produced age-dependent decrease in the activity of serum superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and reductase and in levels of glutathione (GSH), vitamins C, E, and A, and beta-carotene. Changes in the serum antioxidative ability were accompanied by enhanced oxidative modification of lipid (increase in lipid hydroperoxides, malondiadehyde, and 4-hydroxynonenal levels) and protein (rise in carbonyl group levels). Green tea partially protected against changes in antioxidant enzymatic as well as nonenzymatic parameters produced by ethanol and enhanced by aging. Administration of green tea significantly protects cellular components such as lipids and proteins against oxidative modification. Results indicate that green tea effectively protects blood serum against oxidative stress produced by ethanol as well as aging.

PMID: 15129554 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #16 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:25 PM Thread Starter
 
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Green tea extract suppresses the age-related increase in collagen crosslinking and fluorescent products in C57BL/6 mice.

Rutter K, Sell DR, Fraser N, Obrenovich M, Zito M, Starke-Reed P, Monnier VM.

Yorktown High School, Arlington, VA 22207, USA.

Collagen crosslinking during aging in part results from Maillard reaction endproducts of glucose and oxoaldehydes. Because of the tight link between oxidative and carbonyl stress, we hypothesized that natural antioxidants and "nutriceuticals" could block collagen aging in C57BL/6 mice. Six groups of young and adult mice received vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin C&E, blueberry, green tea extract (GTE), or no treatment for a period of 14 weeks. Body weights and collagen glycation were unaltered by the treatment. However, GTE or vitamin C&E combined blocked tendon crosslinking at 10 months of age (p < 0.05, adult group). GTE also blocked fluorescent products at 385 and 440 nm (p = 0.052 and < 0.05, respectively) and tended to decrease skin pentosidine levels. These results suggest that green tea is able to delay collagen aging by an antioxidant mechanism that is in part duplicated by the combination of vitamin C and E.

PMID: 14743550 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #17 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:26 PM Thread Starter
 
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Can teatime increase one's lifetime?

Nakachi K, Eguchi H, Imai K.

Department of Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijiyama, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 732-0815, Japan. [email protected]

Lifestyle-related diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease, are also characterized as aging-related diseases, where aging may be the most potent causal factor. In light of this, prevention of lifestyle-related diseases will depend on slowing the aging process and avoiding the clinical appearance of the diseases. Green tea is now accepted as a cancer preventive on the basis of numerous in vitro, in vivo and epidemiological studies. In addition, green tea has also been reported to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. We found an apparent delay of cancer onset/death and all cause deaths associated with increased consumption of green tea, specifically in ages before 79 in a prospective cohort study of a Japanese population with 13-year follow-up data. This is consistent with analyses of age-specific cancer death rate and cumulative survival, indicating a significant slowing of the increase in cancer death and all cause death with aging. These results indicate that daily consumption of green tea in sufficient amounts will help to prolong life by avoiding pre-mature death, particularly death caused by cancer.

PMID: 12437992 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #18 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:29 PM Thread Starter
 
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The green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and green tea can protect human cellular DNA from ultraviolet and visible radiation-induced damage.

Morley N, Clifford T, Salter L, Campbell S, Gould D, Curnow A.

Cornwall Dermatology Research Project, Polgooth Ward, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Treliske, Truro, Cornwall TR1 3LJ, UK.

BACKGROUND: Antioxidant compounds in green tea may be able to protect against skin carcinogenesis and it is of interest to investigate the mechanisms involved. A study was therefore conducted to determine whether the isolated green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) could prevent ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage in cultured human cells. This work was then extended to investigate whether drinking green tea could afford any UVR protection to human peripheral blood cells collected after tea ingestion. METHODS: The alkaline comet assay was used to compare the DNA damage induced by UVR in cultured human cells with and without the presence of EGCG. The same assay technique was then employed to assess UVR-induced DNA damage in peripheral leucocytes isolated from 10 adult human volunteers before and after drinking 540 ml of green tea. RESULTS: Initial trials found that EGCG afforded concentration-dependent photoprotection to cultured human cells with a maximal activity at a culture concentration of 250 microM. The cells types tested (lung fibroblasts, skin fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes) demonstrated varying susceptibility to the UVR insult provided. The in vivo trials of green tea also demonstrated a photoprotective effect, with samples of peripheral blood cells taken after green tea consumption showing lower levels of DNA damage than those taken prior to ingestion when exposed to 12 min ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. CONCLUSION: The studies showed that green tea and/or some constituents can offer some protection against UV-induced DNA damage in human cell cultures and also in human peripheral blood samples taken post-tea ingestion.

PMID: 15634219 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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post #19 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:29 PM
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GREEN TEA = GOOD FOR YOU! SO DRINK IT.


there guy's that's what it said.. LMAO



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post #20 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-30-2005, 12:33 PM
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lol no shit r1lover


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